INT. ASPIRING SCREENWRITER'S MIND

INT. ASPIRING SCREENWRITER'S MIND

Overthinking in Style.

Currently Reading: House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski; The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon

Currently Watching: Hannibal, Supernatural, Bob's Burgers, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, True Detective, Trophy Wife, Community, Parks and Recreation, Parenthood, Reign, Looking

Ask Me Something

Blue lily, lily blue

the-world-is-a-corner:

sarasarai:

ravenboys:

Agh! Who is this green face on the cover?! Is it Adam?! Does that mean Book, the Third is Adam’s just like DT was Ronan’s?!?!

Also, October? OCTOBER?!?!

I actually have frequently wondered whether any book is going to feel as centered on one character as DT was around Ronan, but I think it’s Blue and Adam for the winners next book.

I never thought it might be one of our kids! I thought it was some manifestation of Cabeswater, or some other thing we haven’t seen yet.

Oh, the one we don’t know about yet! Very possible. It just … doesn’t look like Blue on the cover to me? Maybe I’m just used to how Maggie draws her though.

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Blue lily, lily blue

ravenboys:

Agh! Who is this green face on the cover?! Is it Adam?! Does that mean Book, the Third is Adam’s just like DT was Ronan’s?!?!

Also, October? OCTOBER?!?!

I actually have frequently wondered whether any book is going to feel as centered on one character as DT was around Ronan, but I think it’s Blue and Adam for the winners next book.

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maggie-stiefvater:

Happy St. Mark’s Eve! Behold the official cover and title of Raven Boys III, which comes out October 28, 2014.

maggie-stiefvater:

Happy St. Mark’s Eve! Behold the official cover and title of Raven Boys III, which comes out October 28, 2014.

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brightwalldarkroom:

"…while a PG-rated stop-motion film based on a childrens’ story is definitely a departure for the filmmaker, Fantastic Mr. Fox is still completely and wholly a Wes Anderson film.  Like his other films, there is a color palette here: this one features mustard yellow, candy apple red, and hen brown—with textures of animal fur and gray tweed and corduroy. 
What is it in Wes Anderson’s heart that is so old ? Clint Eastwood is a 138-year-old man and he has made films that are more relevant to these times than Anderson. Can you imagine an Xbox Kinect in a Wes Anderson film? Maybe in the year 2050. Can you imagine if, in The Royal Tenenbaums, Richie Tenenbaum told Eli Cash that he’s in love with his own sister via text message? Or if Raleigh St. Clair updated his Facebook status to “You’ve made a cuckold of me”. What if Rushmore’s Harold Blume had made his fortune in bluetooth headsets? Even now, as I try to imagine the most technologically-advanced item in any Wes Anderson film, it may be the radio transmitter Steve Zissou has implanted in the diving helmets in The Life Aquatic, or possibly the laminator Francis’s bald assistant Brendan must own in The Darjeeling Limited.
I happened upon Rushmore airing abridged on the USA network during the summer vacation between 7th and 8th grade, a secretly strange adolescent who kept an outfit diary, practiced new handwriting styles for the forthcoming school year, and had an eleven step plan to achieving popularity, implemented with occasional success at the baker’s dozen or so schools that I attended. Would I have eventually seen Rushmore, some night in a freshman dormitory? Probably so. But instead I saw it precisely at an age of infinite impression, and it undoubtedly affected me. I started nearly-exclusively wearing men’s ties, polyester from yard sales, glitter eye shadow, and ancient coats that were either much too small or far too big for me. They smelled like damp, aged basements. I collected records for years, heaved them around from place to place in U.S. Postal Service mail bins, reinforced with heavy wire. I’d have nothing to play them on for five years. 
Wes Anderson’s movies just feel right to me, filled with the kind of detail for an archetype, a decade, a side table, or a shirt collar that fellow obsessives can surely appreciate.” 

—Bebe Ballroom, on Wes Anderson and Fantastic Mr. Fox ("I’m Trying to Tell You The Truth About Myself", Bright Wall/Dark Room, Issue #11)

brightwalldarkroom:

"…while a PG-rated stop-motion film based on a childrens’ story is definitely a departure for the filmmaker, Fantastic Mr. Fox is still completely and wholly a Wes Anderson film.  Like his other films, there is a color palette here: this one features mustard yellow, candy apple red, and hen brown—with textures of animal fur and gray tweed and corduroy.

What is it in Wes Anderson’s heart that is so old ? Clint Eastwood is a 138-year-old man and he has made films that are more relevant to these times than Anderson. Can you imagine an Xbox Kinect in a Wes Anderson film? Maybe in the year 2050. Can you imagine if, in The Royal Tenenbaums, Richie Tenenbaum told Eli Cash that he’s in love with his own sister via text message? Or if Raleigh St. Clair updated his Facebook status to “You’ve made a cuckold of me”. What if Rushmore’s Harold Blume had made his fortune in bluetooth headsets? Even now, as I try to imagine the most technologically-advanced item in any Wes Anderson film, it may be the radio transmitter Steve Zissou has implanted in the diving helmets in The Life Aquatic, or possibly the laminator Francis’s bald assistant Brendan must own in The Darjeeling Limited.

I happened upon Rushmore airing abridged on the USA network during the summer vacation between 7th and 8th grade, a secretly strange adolescent who kept an outfit diary, practiced new handwriting styles for the forthcoming school year, and had an eleven step plan to achieving popularity, implemented with occasional success at the baker’s dozen or so schools that I attended. Would I have eventually seen Rushmore, some night in a freshman dormitory? Probably so. But instead I saw it precisely at an age of infinite impression, and it undoubtedly affected me. I started nearly-exclusively wearing men’s ties, polyester from yard sales, glitter eye shadow, and ancient coats that were either much too small or far too big for me. They smelled like damp, aged basements. I collected records for years, heaved them around from place to place in U.S. Postal Service mail bins, reinforced with heavy wire. I’d have nothing to play them on for five years.

Wes Anderson’s movies just feel right to me, filled with the kind of detail for an archetype, a decade, a side table, or a shirt collar that fellow obsessives can surely appreciate.”

—Bebe Ballroom, on Wes Anderson and Fantastic Mr. Fox ("I’m Trying to Tell You The Truth About Myself", Bright Wall/Dark Room, Issue #11)

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feministwerewolf:

girljanitor:

Lost silent film with all-Native American cast found

The Daughter of Dawn, an 80-minute feature film, was shot in July of 1920 in the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge near Lawton, southwest Oklahoma. It was unique in the annals of silent film (or talkies, for that matter) for having a cast of 300 Comanches and Kiowas who brought their own clothes, horses, tipis, everyday props and who told their story without a single reference to the United States Cavalry. It was a love story, a four-person star-crossed romance that ends with the two main characters together happily ever after. There are two buffalo hunt sequences with actual herds of buffalo being chased down by hunters on bareback just as they had done on the Plains 50 years earlier.

The male lead was played by White Parker; another featured female role was played by Wanada Parker. They were the son and daughter of the powerful Comanche chief Quanah Parker, the last of the free Plains Quahadi Comanche warriors. He never lost a battle to United States forces, but, his people sick and starving, he surrendered at Fort Sill in 1875. Quanah was the son of Comanche chief Peta Nocona and Cynthia Ann Parker, the daughter of Euro-American settlers who had grown up in the tribe after she was kidnapped as a child by the Comanches who killed her parents. She was the model for Stands With a Fist in Dances with Wolves.

You can watch the first ten minutes of the film here. It is over 90 years old, and was produced by, directed by, and stars only Native American people.

Always reblog when this crosses my dash!

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rmlfvr:

These classical musicians play their instruments in a way you’ve never seen before.

A rather compelling visual experience, on top of being a flawless musical demonstration, performed by Salut Salon, a charming German quartet from Hamburg. 

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pratleyjames:

Fangirl Challenge - [2/10] Movies

↳ Serenity

"People don’t like to be meddled with. We tell them what to do, what to think, don’t run, don’t walk. We’re in their homes and in their heads and we haven’t the right. We’re meddlesome."

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Jason Mraz - I Won't Give Up

Jason Mraz - I Won't Give Up

I had to learn what I’ve got,
& what I’m not, & who I am

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Fairy tales do not tell children the dragons exist. Children already know that dragons exist. Fairy tales tell children the dragons can be killed.
- G.K. Chesterton (via ctymouse)
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